Category Archives: alisa leonard

Facebook’s "Secret Strategy"

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You could have guessed (via)

Infographic: The Economics of Facebook

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facebook-economy
via Visual Economics

TBL: The Year Open Data Went Worldwide

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I love everything about this. #Dataportability

Touche: BYU Takes Cue from @OldSpice

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Of all the copycats I expected post the @OldSpice hub bub, my alma mater, Brigham Young University, was perhaps the last brand I expected to get in on the meme game. For any of you who might be familiar with BYU’s uber conservative culture, it might be a bit of a surprise, but I have to say well done indeed, copycats ;)

OMG Old Spice

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Did you hear that? Another explosion somewhere out on the interwebs has happened, and this one smells like Old Spice. Yesterday Old Spice launched, quite innocuously, a campaign that has now reached veritable meme status. Yesterday this message appeared quite innocently on the Old Spice Twitter feed:

“Today could be just like the other 364 days you log into twitter,” it read. “Or maybe the Old Spice man shows up.”

What happened next is internet viral gold. Immediately the Old Spice Man, Isaiah Mustafa, began fielding questions from Twitter, Reddit, Yahoo Answers, YouTube, etc, the replies to which were short, pithy video responses created on the fly. The clincher was that of the 115 videos produced, many of them were responses to media, digital influencers and celebrities alike. Major news media, Twitter, the blogosphere, and your inbox are all a flurry with buzz about this campaign. It worked. They got us all talking (and maybe even buying).

It has long been a mantra of the web and digital advertising that “content is king.” Many of the accolades showered on this Old Spice campaign has been directed towards the content itself, and how engaging and awesome it is. How it is engaging influencers in real-time.

Now while the content itself is great– let us not underestimate the mechanism by which this great content could be surfaced, engaged with and cared about.

The success of this effort is predicated on good old fashioned Influencer Marketing. Human to human interaction. Talking. There isn’t just a creative content strategy at play here, there is a creative influencer outreach and conversation management strategy at play here. Word-of-mouth, engagement, influence. Too often these words get lost or diluted from constant punditry. But the reality is that this campaign worked because not only was great content created, but there was conscious focus and planning around fostering real-time, human dialogue through targeted outreach and community management. It is the dialogue which has now constructed a brand experience that the brand alone could never have created on its own. It highlights a new way of thinking about brand experience, pointing towards a need for live experiences and real-time marketing. The challenge of course, and the litmus for when it is done well, is that “real time marketing” shouldn’t look or act like marketing at all. Rather, it feels human, it feels participatory, it is driven by conversation.

Also, this is just brilliant….and true. This is the exact formula we use too:

memex

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the real life social network

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nothing particularly new here (been saying this for a several years now), but well thought out and stated with clarity. remember folks, the web is social

proof points

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iPhone & iPad Shot (Returned)

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Ambient Data & Techno-Cognitive Modalities of the FUTURE

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I love the future. I love thinking about it, hypothesizing about it, bemoaning it and awaiting its arrival. It elicits visions of hoverboards (seriously, WHY aren’t they here by now!), jetpacks, silver jumpsuits and of course, a world of dynamically responsive objects based on ambient identity data, right?

“The future is NOW” may be a well-worn axiom of hackneyed corporate wisdom, but I’m into it and drinking the kool-aid like a high schooler on a bender. Today’s post is an ode to musing about the FUTURE. Get into it.

We’ve talked a lot here on TWIS about things like oh, you know, Synaptic Web, Pragmatic Web, data ubiquity, and other equally name-droppy concepts. But what exactly does all this mumbo-jumbo mean? To put it in CEO terms, how the hell does something like “the synaptic web,” interoperable data and an “internet of things” impact my business? What does it look like, what does it do?

Well, thankfully, the master curators over at Infosthetics found conceptual photographic mockups of what an “internet of things”– a world of networked objects and places, connected to a synaptic web, begetting dynamic, pragmatic “user” experiences might be like…or at least look like. Sure, its all pie in the sky (or is it?)